SINR Diagram with Interference Cancellation

Chen Avin, Asaf Cohen, Yoram Haddad, Erez Kantor, Zvi Lotker, Merav Parter and David Peleg

Abstract:
This paper studies the reception zones of a wireless network in the SINR model with receivers that employ interference cancellation (IC). IC is a recently developed technique that allows a receiver to decode interfering signals, and cancel them from the received signal in order to decode its intended message.
We first derive the important topological properties of the reception zones and their relation to high-order Voronoi diagrams and other geometric objects. We then discuss the computational issues that arise when seeking an efficient description of the zones. Our main fundamental result states that although potentially there are exponentially many possible cancellation orderings, and as a result, reception zones, in fact there are much fewer nonempty such zones. We prove a linear bound (hence tight) on the number of zones and provide a polynomial time algorithm to describe the diagram. Moreover, we introduce a novel parameter, the
Compactness Parameter, which influences the tightness of our bounds. We then utilize these properties to devise a logarithmic time algorithm to answer point-location queries for networks with IC.

Guest: Merav Parter   
Host: Shantanu Das

Wireless Connectivity and Capacity

Magnus M. Halldorsson, Pradipta Mitra

Abstract:

Given $n$ wireless transceivers located in a plane, a fundamental problem in wireless communications is to construct a strongly connected digraph on them such that the constituent links can be scheduled in fewest possible time slots, assuming the SINR model of interference.
In this paper, we provide an algorithm that connects an arbitrary point set in $O(\log n)$ slots, improving on the previous best bound of $O(\log^2 n)$ due to Moscibroda. This is complemented with a super-constant lower bound on our approach to connectivity. An important feature is that the algorithms allow for bi-directional (half-duplex) communication.
One implication of this result is an improved bound of $\Omega(1/\log n)$ on the worst-case capacity of wireless networks, matching the best bound known for the extensively studied average-case.
We explore the utility of oblivious power assignments, and show that essentially all such assignments result in a worst case bound of $\Omega(n)$ slots for connectivity. This rules out a recent claim of a $O(\log n)$ bound using oblivious power. On the other hand, using our result we show that $O(\min(\log \Delta, \log n \cdot (\log n + \log \log \Delta)))$ slots suffice, where $\Delta$ is the ratio between the largest and the smallest links in a minimum spanning tree of the points.
Our results extend to the related problem of minimum latency aggregation scheduling, where we show that aggregation scheduling with $O(\log n)$ latency is possible, improving upon the previous best known latency of $O(\log^3 n)$. We also initiate the study of network design problems in the SINR model beyond strong connectivity, obtaining similar bounds for biconnected and $k$-edge connected structures.

Guest: Magnus M. Halldorsson

Host: Merav Parter

Coordinated Consensus in Dynamic Networks

Fabian Kuhn, Yoram Moses and Rotem Oshman

Abstract:
We study several variants of coordinated consensus in dynamic networks. We assume a synchronous model, where the communication graph for each round is chosen by a worst-case adversary. The network topology is always connected, but can change completely from one round to the next. The model captures mobile and wireless networks, where communication can be unpredictable. In this setting we study the fundamental problems of eventual, simultaneous, and ∆-coordinated consensus, as well as their relationship to other distributed problems, such as determining the size of the network. We show that in the absence of a good initial upper bound on the size of the network, eventual consensus is as hard as computing deterministic functions of the input, e.g., the minimum or maximum of inputs to the nodes. We also give an algorithm for computing such functions that is optimal in every execution.

Guest: Rotem Oshman
Host: Chen Avin